Highlights from the Public Education Forum 2020

Highlights from the Public Education Forum 2020


– Lots of presidential candidates say I wanna be the, you know,
education president. And today is about the hows: how are we going to do this?
(gentle music) – Public education has been under attack and educators across the
country have felt so demoralized and disrespected. Can you please share why
having a voice on the job is so important? And what you would do to
make it easier for teachers and employees to organize? – We need a revolution
in terms of how we feel about education and learning. (applause) I have introduced and will
implement as President the most sweeping pro labor law reform in the modern history of this country. And what it will do is
allow 50% of workers in a bargaining unit, plus one. If they sign a card saying
they wanna join a union they will have a union.
(cheers) – It should come as no surprise
to anybody in this room that I see the central
problem in America today as inequality of opportunity. And I see the central challenge as how we create we opportunity, not just for children born into privilege, but how create opportunity for every single one of our children. – All those people complain
about how much we’re spending on education, which we’re not
spending anywhere near enough. They’re the very people
who don’t understand. The better educated the public
the better of everybody is. They are better off. – What we need to do is
figure out how to support our kids and our teachers
as we transition to a set of 21st century schools. We have to massively
increase what we pay teachers in this country. That’s what I’m for. They have to be paid what, they have to be paid on a
scale that looks like the other professionals in their community. – ‘Cause we rally around our teachers, we rally around our kids, and
we rally around our schools. America is already there. The problem is we can’t seem
to get Washington there. – In my local, the Philadelphia
Federation of Teachers, we are in the midst of a
devastating facilities crisis where more than 200 schools
are facing toxic conditions such as lead, asbestos, mold, and other environmental hazards. – So we have to make this
case to the American people that our kids deserve this, that our teachers deserve this, and that we shouldn’t have
elementary school kids dying from lead paint poisoning. (applause) – Hi, my name is Salema Sabre. I am a sixth grader at
H.B. Wilson Family School in Camden, New Jersey. Here is my question. Why doesn’t my school
have money for a librarian or a music teacher or for a
permanent teacher for second and fifth grades?
(cheering) – The way we’re paying
for school is legislating inequality going forward. It’s not right, it’s not smart. We, it’s absolutely un-American and unjust and this just should be at
the heart of reframing justice in the United States of America. – I see how teachers find
first of all that their autonomy is being taken away. That they are often being
reduced to test administrators. And now we’re also seeing
teachers expected by some to suddenly turn into professional
armed security personnel. – As President, how will you
commit to fully funding IDEA, Title One, deliver on a
long overdue broken promise? (cheering) – The idea that in this
god-forsaken lousy tax break given to the super wealthy, that we cannot find the
money to fund Title One, IDEA, to deal with making
sure that teachers are able to write off their student debt. And those folks who say they
don’t wanna fund this stuff, it’s ridiculous.
(upbeat music) – What’s happened today
kind of flipped the script. For the candidates for
presidency of the United States of America to actually
listen to what we see from the lens of our lived experience. These candidates are listening to us and the community in communities as opposed to the one
who’s in the White House. (upbeat music)

One thought on “Highlights from the Public Education Forum 2020

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *