Google Wave Overview

Google Wave Overview


>>Hi, I’m Steph.>>And I’m Greg.>>We’re the Google Wave Team. You know us.
We’re the people who made an eighty minute video to tell you about our product. Here’s our attempt to tell you what Wave is
in only ten minutes. Don’t be mad when we try to smoosh a lot in. Wave can do a lot
of things. Wave was built in Sydney, Australia. Lars
and Jens started the project. They helped create Google Maps. This is what computers looked like when e-mail
was invented more than forty years ago. Technology has advanced pretty far since then. We took inspiration from all these innovations
and tried to imagine what e-mail would look like if it were invented today. Out popped
Wave. Here’s how Wave is different from e-mail.
When you send an e-mail, everyone gets a copy of the message. A Wave is a hosted conversation.
There is one copy and anyone can contribute to it. This model allows you to do many types
of communication and collaboration in one tool. Let’s say I want to plan a barbeque with my
friends. I’ll create a new Wave and I’ll add Greg as a participant. Greg opens the Wave.
Greg can reply anywhere in the Wave.
When I have the Wave open, I can see what Greg types as he types it. I’ll add Anna to the Wave. She can see everything
we see. Because it’s a hosted conversation, anyone on the Wave can edit any part of the
Wave. You can see Greg and Anna editing right now. If I close the Wave and they keep editing
it, their changes will be highlighted when I come back. Let’s say I want to invite my friends to the
barbeque. I’ll create a new Wave. I want to know if they can attend, so I’m going to add
a Yes/No/Maybe gadget to this Wave. Gadgets are a way to present and collect information
other than text. Now I’ll add a group of my friends to the
Wave, the Wavers. Everyone in the group can see the Wave when they are online and respond.
You can see responses coming in now. Why does Dan always say “no†to my barbeques? If I want to show people where the barbeque
is, I can highlight the address and add a map. As I zoom in, you can see Greg’s map
changes too. Any developer can build these gadgets.>>People always want to drag and drop files
directly from their desktop into web applications. With Wave, you can. Watch as Stephanie creates
a new Wave and then drags and drops a bunch of photos from iPhoto directly into Wave.
Thumbnails will appear on my machine as soon as they start uploading on hers. I can then
drag and drop photos from my machine directly into the Wave as well. You can see at the bottom of the screen there’s
an Images menu. This menu allows you to operate on all the images in the Wave. Not just the
ones you added. This is an easy and convenient way to create a collaborative photo album
using Wave. Now that we have a Wave with lots of images
in it, we want to share it with our friends. Drag our friend, Bloggy, on to the Wave. This
will publish the Wave on Steph’s blog. Embedding is an easy way to put Waves directly
into any website, much the same way you can do with maps today. Watch as I go to Steph’s blog. You can see
on Steph’s blog that we embed the whole Wave. Not just the images. This includes all of
the UI. Watch as I leave a comment. Everything that I type on the blog, immediately appears
in Steph’s Wave client. Steph can respond in her Wave client and her typing immediately
appears on the blog. Since I contributed to the blog, the Wave will also show up in my
Wave client and we can continue the conversation from there. Embedding Waves is good for developers because
it allows them to drop a rich, collaborative UI into websites with very little code. It’s
great for users because it allows them to have a consistent UI as well as aggregate
conversations they care about all in one place.>>The combination of collaborative editing
and in-line discussion makes Wave a powerful platform for document creation. I’ll show
you that by opening a design doc we wrote on our team. I’ll make a little more room
and you can see this has Rich-Fonts, it has diagrams, it has in-line discussion. The best way to view a Wave when it has picked
up a certain amount of structure is using a feature we built called “Playback.â€
Playback tells you how the Wave built up. Steven, our trusted server guy, wrote a draft.
He added a bunch of people. Lars the Manager said it’s a good but needs more. Steven added
more, I made some edits, and so on. I can pick up this slider and move to any part of
the Wave. Playback is a powerful way to investigate
and manipulate the history of a Wave.>>†Robots†are pieces of software
that can be added to a Wave, like a participant, and in fact, can act like a participant. They
can do anything a person can do on the Wave. They can watch the typing that’s going on,
they can add other participants to the Wave, and in fact they can even write into the Wave.>>Let me show you another extension to Wave
that lets you interface to another communication system. I’ll start a new Wave and I’ll add my friend
Tweety the Twitbot. As you can see, Tweety puts in a form. I’m going to sign in with
my Twitter username and password. Unfortunately, it’s twephanie. When I submit that form, the
Robot notices it and goes and uses Twitter’s API to get updates from the people I follow. I can also put in my own update. Tweety notices that and uses the Twitter APIs
to update my Twitter account. You can also use Tweety to search over the public timeline
of Twitter. Imagine there’s a phrase I care a lot about, like Google Wave. I can enter
it here and Tweety will use the API to pull in Tweets with that word in them. This way,
you can use Tweety to be an alert or alarm for a phrase you care about. I can actually
leave this Wave in my account and anytime there’s a match, this Wave will become active
for me. I can open it and see the new content. Robots can be used to interface to other systems.
In this case, it was Twitter but it could be anything with an API.>>Imagine Steph and I are friends. I only
speak French. She only speaks English. But we want to communicate in real-time. Rosy
is a robot that interfaces in Google’s translation engine and allows us to translate everything
in a Wave, in real-time, if we’d like to. I’m set up for French. Steph’s set up for
English. I’ll add Rosy to the Wave and then say “Hiâ€
to her. “Bonjour Steph!†As you can see, it comes up for Steph in English.
What Steph types comes up for me in French. “Je voudrais visite Paris.†So you see, Steph and I can communicate with
each other in real-time even though we don’t speak the language using Robots, Wave, and
our buddy, Rosy.>>Whew.>>Oh god.>>Ten minutes goes by fast.>>Oh my god. It was like, forever. Jeez. Is
it still rolling?>>Still rolling. Thanks Greg.>>Good job.>>Good job.

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